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Do You Know The Rule? (5 Questions That Challenge Your Tennis Knowledge)

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Do You Know The Rule? (5 Questions That Challenge Your Tennis Knowledge)
1. Your opponent can’t stand outside the sidelines of the court being played on when serving
2. If you hit your opponent(s) with your serve in the air you win the point automatically (here’s the link to this actual situation happening at Wimbledon: de-vid.com/video/video-LHsOkBl1wRE.html )
3. You can’t call double bounce on your opponent
4. If you touch the net with your body or racket you automatically lose the point
5. If the ball goes over the net and bounces back over the net with a ton of backspin, it’s the point of the original player who hit the ball

You got this!

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29 Nov 2021

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KOMMENTARE 701
Jody Lenihan
Jody Lenihan Vor Monat
One clarification on question #4: if your momentum causes you to touch the net AFTER the ball has bounced twice on the other side, then the point is no longer live, and the point is yours.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yep. You are correct. You can touch the net when the ball is not in play.
Milton Schreiber
Excellent video. Here's another rules situation I've often wondered about. Suppose it is the first point of a doubles set. The receiver is in a normal position to return serve. The receiver's partner is near the baseline and centerline. The serve comes down the middle, and the receiver's partner returns the ball into play. Since this is the first point in the set, would this be legal? Would it simply require the receiver's partner to play the deuce court for the remainder of the set?
Chris Sioufi
Chris Sioufi Vor 29 Tage
@BreakTennisLeague that's not true. It is against the rules to step onto your opponent's playing area (doubles alleys excluded in singles) while the ball is in play. Once your feet touch their side of the court, the point is over and they are awarded the point. Nothing of yours can touch your opponent's side of the court during a point; this applies to your racquet, dampener, a piece of clothing, etc.
BreakTennisLeague
@68ctcb Yeah, sure. Even more, you can jump over the net and play it standing on other side of the. Of course, u still cant touch the net.
68ctcb
68ctcb Vor Monat
In the last situation where the ball bounces back over the net due to backspin, can the returning player run around the net onto the opposition side to hit the ball while it is in play.?
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
This is a good one Milton
Calvin R
Calvin R Vor Monat
@kNautyyEspicyyy! you can stand where you want but you can't volley the serve
Will Turbo
Will Turbo Vor Monat
I was a USTA official for about 4 years, so thankfully I had run into all of these situations . Thanks for the post.
Bill bill3168
Bill bill3168 Vor Monat
@Will Turbo Okay. I thought the center hashmark was a different type of boundary.
Will Turbo
Will Turbo Vor Monat
@Bill bill3168 If I understand your question correctly, the answer is yes! Just as long as his body is in the legal appropriate area for serving.
Bill bill3168
Bill bill3168 Vor Monat
If a right handed player on the ad court, tosses his serve so that toss crosses the center hash mark. He makes contact on the other side of the center hash mark without moving his feet. Can he reach across the center hashmark and make contact and have it be a good serve. Is that a good serve or is it a fault?
Adam Cravets
Adam Cravets Vor Monat
@Will Turbo I totally agree about the spirit of the sport but in that same spirit it seems to me that having the other player call the double bounce would be more appropriate. I look at it like a foot fault. You don't call those on yourself because you aren't looking at your feet when serving. When chasing down a ball you get focused on the ball and may miss the double bounce. Seems like if that happens the other player should be allowed to correct the situation. Just thinking out loud here...
Will Turbo
Will Turbo Vor Monat
@Adam Cravets that would not be in keeping with the spirit of the sport. You could also call in balls out, etc.... The double bounce can be difficult for a player to call on himself, because sometimes you don't even see it happen. I hope that makes sense.
Taylor Doherty
Taylor Doherty Vor Monat
Another cool thing about the last rule is if the ball bounces back over, you can run around the net post and hit the ball from beside the court, as long as you don't step into the opposing court.
Ryan Moroz
Ryan Moroz Vor Monat
@Taylor Doherty Dude that's crazy! Thanks for sharing the video.
Lucas Kalisz
Lucas Kalisz Vor Monat
That's actually true. I used to play tennis and now I play paddle and this is actually pretty common among pro-players, since you're playing between walls, you want to bring the ball back into your court or out of the walls. You usually do that by doing a smash that hits the court and then bounces into the bottom wall, and when it bounces it can come back into your side of the court or it could get out of the court over the side wall. The thing with that is that your opponent if he is quick enough, he can keep the ball "alive" or he can try to make the ball pass into your door and go for the point.
Taylor Doherty
Taylor Doherty Vor Monat
@Mark Whitbread I mean it really is clear cut, being called for hindrance is a completely different rule. The rule I'm quoting is that you're allowed to cross the net of you are in the out of bounds area. I wouldn't be surprised if players have ran to their bench mid point in doubles to grab a racquet after a broken string or something dumb like that.
Mark Whitbread
Mark Whitbread Vor Monat
Although I saw this allowed in a pro game recently, it is umpire's call in any situation like this whether the player hitting the ball could be said to be hindering/unfairly distracting their opponent. I've seen these called both ways. It is not clear-cut
Taylor Doherty
Taylor Doherty Vor Monat
@JB Marais de-vid.com/u-shortsSPUw8FkSBEQ?feature=share Happened on the pro tour, is this good enough?
Ivan Miasnikov
Ivan Miasnikov Vor Monat
Hey Ryan! Just wanted to thank you for using a tennis board. It is refreshing and easier to remember the rules/strategies this way and also picture it in our heads. Thumbs up!! :)
Micky 02
Micky 02 Vor Monat
Thanks a lot! It was fun, quick and I’ve learned much from a simple quiz. Very good explanation!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Glad you liked the video Micky!
Tensai Juusan
Tensai Juusan Vor Monat
Another great video - good to know these rules and avoid needless arguments. Thanks for sharing coach!
Lucas Kalisz
Lucas Kalisz Vor Monat
This was a great video! I played tennis in my childhood but then it got complicated to keep on playing because it's very hard and expensive to play on a court in my city. Thanks to the pandemy, paddle became popular again in my country and I started playing it with my friends since it's more affordable and accessible. And boy I've been having fun! So for me, actually know most of these rules because of paddle. It's funny because this game actually exploids many of this "wacky" rules of tennis, and actually many of them are common situations in paddle/padel. Since you're playing between walls, it's almost an objective to bring the ball back into your side, and sometimes pro-player counter that by doing a drop or sending the ball into your side of the net (If that happens and the ball hits the ground just once and you didn't touch the ball yet, the ball is still in game because it didn't bounce twice).
Fred Leonard
Fred Leonard Vor Monat
Good video. I’ve explained those many times. On the 1st one remember the infamous foot fault called on Marat Safin at the Aussie open by the official at the other end of the court when serving on the duce side his right foot crossed the extension of the center hash. It’s interesting that officials seem to be instructed not to call that because it’s common to see that foot fault it never called
lerouxisonfire
lerouxisonfire Vor Monat
Thank you so much! I feel so vindicated! Especially on the last one with reaching over and hitting down into the "opponent's" net.
Erwin Chung
Erwin Chung Vor Monat
This was a fun video to watch Coach Ryan! I have a question about calling your opponent's foot fault while serving during a match. I once saw an opponent step at least 1 foot (12 inches) into the court before striking the ball several times in the same match. It was an obvious foot fault, but we didn't call it. Are we allowed to call it? Or the player has to call it upon himself / herself just like the double bounce penalty?
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@Gezza I'm in Australia and one guy is at least a foot inside on every serve. Other guys are also foot faulting. I really don't care though, but people should probably say something
Brad White
Brad White Vor Monat
@Matt C So why not start serving from even further into the court when serving to that person, might point out how absurd they're being?... oh, already suggested lol
qc1okay
qc1okay Vor Monat
@Gezza I've seen it a few times a year. Almost always, it's mentioned during warmup serves so that the footfaulter knows ahead of time. Much easier in doubles than singles, since receiver's partner is so close to server that server knows someone has a great view of the rule-breaking. Even server's own partner can look. I've never seen the game come to a standstill, though once there was a two-minute argument. Intentional footfaulting (or intentionally not caring after being told you're footfaulting) is no different than cheating on line calls, since it's the baseline you're cheating on when stepping on it during serving.
Gezza
Gezza Vor Monat
@qc1okay Yep ok. In Australia though, with 40 years of comp never seen a player do this. In USA how often have you seen this done? I would imagine all hell would break lose as the game would come to a stand still....
Matt C
Matt C Vor Monat
@qc1okay This was a few years ago and I was the junior in a senior team. I think I did vocally suggest I could just serve from a yard away from the net if we weren't bothering with the footfault rule but my team told me just to carry on. Still annoys me that he got away with it. I'd be a lot more argumentative about it nowdays! Sadly amateur leagues tend to assume everyone is going to play fairly and for the fun of the game and don't really have any setup for dealing with problem players. They cheat and get away with it because others can't be bothered to complain and probably not get anywhere, so they go on doing it.
Patrick Kyle
Patrick Kyle Vor Monat
The second question about hitting a player from the serve - this happens with a guy at my club. When he's playing against me on the ad side and I'm serving to the deuce box, he stands on the serve line T to put me off, so knowing this rule I serve straight at him. Results about 50-50 as I win the point sometimes by hitting him but other times he manages to dodge and the serve goes out.
Vin One
Vin One Vor Monat
@Mel Kirwan I am going to lobby USTA
Mel Kirwan
Mel Kirwan Vor Monat
@Vin One Are you going to rewrite the rules then?
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@Vin One I tend to agree with you Vin. It's quite easy to win points by hitting the player at the net etc but that sort of game plan won't last long, one way or the other.
Vin One
Vin One Vor Monat
@Mike C Indeed. I would NEVER use that "rule" to gain a point. I have seen this happen and it nearly took the opponents eye out as the ball missed the guy's eye by a couple of inches. All hell was about to break, and we had to intervene to stop a complete disaster on the court. The guy who was hit was 6' 3" and strong. The hitter a few inches shorter. If we had not stopped it, it would have been ugly.
Mike C
Mike C Vor Monat
@Vin One even though that is the rule to me that's sinking pretty low to win a point and yes could lead to trouble. I've seen raquets thrown for minor incidents.
Matt Gerrans
Matt Gerrans Vor Monat
Thanks for adding in point 6. That happened to me in a match several months ago. I didn't know you could reach over the net to hit the ball. It makes sense as you phrased it: you can do it after the ball has bounced on your side.
azatron
azatron Vor Monat
Nice video. For #4, it wasn't made clear at first when you mentioned the scenario, but it's just that you can't touch the net when the point is LIVE. If your shot has already bounced twice (2nd bounce could be the fence) and the point is over, then you can touch the net, although I would still always try to avoid touching the net as a habit.
Matt C
Matt C Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis In this scenario is the rule the same as for the previous one where you can't call a double bounce on your opponent's side. In this case if they hit the net but don't call it can you claim it, it isn't a call on 'their side' now, but it is something I have seen happen a lot of times, far more than the double bounce. I guess there are some who know they've done it and don't want to admit it and give the point away, but there are also clearly others where they touch with a foot or something while playing the shot and don't notice, but from further away it is clear to you. I guess again you probably can't call it though I would at least point out the fault.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
You are correct. Can touch but not during live point. Thanks!!
Benjamin Bjerke, MD
Wild. The starting serve scenario (#1) just came up in my match today. You must've been watching. And how frustrating is #3 - the last person who knows if it double bounces is usually the person hitting the ball.
Travis K
Travis K Vor Monat
Actually, they should be the first to know. From an outsider's perspective, it can be hard to tell if the ball bounced a second time before they hit it when it all can happen within a fraction of a second whereas the person hitting it can hear and feel if the ball bounced again before they hit it (kind of like a 6th sense). The only issue is that it's easy to cheat when that's the case. (My example applies to a mediocre and up level, perhaps not beginners)
Richard Z
Richard Z Vor Monat
Geez, this is sooooooo funny, love these kinds of videos, Ryan! Meanwhile, I also learned a lot from this video, especially the first one, I thought the opponent can stand at anywhere to start the serve
Miltos Vouty
Miltos Vouty Vor Monat
A question for the part 2 maybe.. When a player (amatuer mostly) hits the ball and the ball makes contact with the string of the racquet twice (you can tell by the funny spin the ball gets) is this a fault or an error for the player?
Rajesh Sahasrabuddhe
@Kari Pintakivi yeah - I've heard that if you have slow motion video, the strings almost always contact the ball more than once.
Kari Pintakivi
Kari Pintakivi Vor Monat
@Pritesh Mistry The rule changed some years ago. Too difficult to endorse.
Pritesh Mistry
Pritesh Mistry Vor Monat
This is something unusual unlike cricket
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
As long as it’s one swing and inadvertent (not intentional) then it’s ok to double hit. The point continues.
Reinaldo Artidiello
One rule I find very interesting is that a player can hit the ball around the net post, the player can go wide and hit the ball around and below the level of the net. Roger Federer has a collection of points like that.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yep. You don’t need to hit over the net. You can hit around it.
Lava1964
Lava1964 Vor 22 Tage
That was excellent. I knew four out of five (missing the first one.) One question: At the professional level, can the chair umpire call a double bounce?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 22 Tage
Yes the umps have the control in pro matches. They make all final calls.
Jay Blumenstein
Jay Blumenstein Vor Monat
Great video Ryan - growing up one of my favorite books ever was “Knotty Problems in Baseball” that was my souvenir at Cooperstown. Your video has done justice to the tennis version of this - well done ! I see what you mean, hitting the ball into the net on the other side is just like a let - good analogy. Question that came up recently - my partner let go of his racquet but on the next shot managed to tap the ball over with his hand (for an apparent drop shot winner) - what’s the ruling ?
Michele Grassi
Michele Grassi Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Correct.... many many years ago it was allowed but they changed the rule, and i agree with ITF decisions
Helio Beltrão
Helio Beltrão Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis thanks!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Helio Beltrão doesn’t count. Racket must be in your hand went you contact the ball.
Helio Beltrão
Helio Beltrão Vor Monat
What if you throw the racquet, and it hits the ball to the opponent’s court as a winner?
thomas medeiros
thomas medeiros Vor Monat
You can not touch the ball and your body and clothing can not come in contact with the ball.
lance doe
lance doe Vor Monat
Hey Ryan, Sorry if I missed this question/answer, but when you say "allowed to stand" inside the singles or doubles line (whichever applies) Does that mean both feet ENTIRELY within the line extending out? Part of both feet? Part of just one foot? I know its just detail, but I was curious
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Happy to clarify. Both of your feet must be entirely within the side line. Of the court you’re using to play (singles or doubles)
DataAndColours
DataAndColours Vor Monat
Not a tennis player, just curious: So in scenario 5, if you see the ball spinning back by itself to the opponent's side, can you jump over the net, hit the ball back towards the net and see that it dribbles before you actually land on their side and hence win the point in a moment in time you are completely on the opponent's side with your entire body, but just still in the air?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yes. In that scenario you’d win.
Leo
Leo Vor Monat
Thank you Ryan for this very fun and informative video ! I have a question : When the opponent makes a short ball, we run on the ball and when we catch it at the last moment, at arm's length, we carry the ball on the racket for a half a second before releasing it towards the opposing camp. Is there a fault ? Thank you
Emmanuel Makoba
Emmanuel Makoba Vor Monat
@Bill Wall Haha same here at times as well.
Bill Wall
Bill Wall Vor Monat
@Emmanuel Makoba maybe not. I don't understand a lot of things.
Emmanuel Makoba
Emmanuel Makoba Vor Monat
@Bill Wall I don't think you got what he was asking. @Leo its your point because its impossible to carry a ball at arms length while running forward.
Bill Wall
Bill Wall Vor Monat
That’s your opponent’s point. You have to swing at the ball. You can’t catch it on your strings.
danny yiu
danny yiu Vor Monat
Thanks Ryan. Informative and interesting clip! On the last rule, I wonder instead of reaching over the net, if the ball spin back far away from the net, can I run into the opponent side of court and hit it before it bounces again?
Mark T. Wirth
Mark T. Wirth Vor Monat
@Xin Zheng No. ITF rule 24g states player loses point if - “The player or the racket, whether in the player’s hand or not, or anything which the player is wearing or carrying touches the net, net posts/singles sticks, cord or metal cable, strap or band, or the opponent’s court at any time while the ball is in play”. Note that this includes your dampener coming out of your racquet and landing in your opponent’s court.
Xin Zheng
Xin Zheng Vor Monat
Does no stepping on the other side of court apply to racket touching and supporting on the ground to avoid touching the net? Meaning if if you hit the ball right, no touching net, and use your racket on the other side of ground and hold yourself, it is a lose?
Bill Wall
Bill Wall Vor Monat
I think you can run around the post then hit it into the net on their side. There may be a video floating around where that has happened.
Mark T. Wirth
Mark T. Wirth Vor Monat
Cannot step into opponent’s court (within singles or doubles lines depending on what you are playing). But you can hit a ball on opponent’s side if you remain outside the lines.
Robert Daugherty
I was thinking the same thing and say yes.
Anthony Belz
Anthony Belz Vor 19 Tage
For Q#6, can you jump over the net (without touching the net) to play the shot (before the ball lands)? OR Is there a rule that states you can never enter the opponents area of play?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 19 Tage
You’re never allowed to touch their side of the court. So if you jump, you better win the point before you land which is basically impossible.
Ralph Gorgoglione
On scenario number 4, it depends on whether the ball you hit has bounced a 2nd time or not before you touch the net, because at that stage, the point is over.
R S
R S Vor Monat
Also matters if you are playing singles on a court with singles sticks attached to the net. The outside portion of the net between the singles sticks and the net post are not considered part of the net with regard to this rule.
Jordan
Jordan Vor Monat
This is great. I knew most of the rules except the double bounce one. Sending to all my friends who flout the rules and get upset when I call them out 🤣
Tennis Fan
Tennis Fan Vor Monat
Yup, I knew everything about that fifth rule, Milos Raonic did that in a mixed doubles match at the Aussie Open years ago. I try to purposely hit a back spinner dropshot anyways
wade s
wade s Vor Monat
Fascinating video. Played tennis for years and didn't know some of these. Really well explained.
Jose Noel F. Teh
Thanks heaps Ryan! I love this video about tricky tennis rules! Cheers!
Thomas Humphrey
Thomas Humphrey Vor Monat
Really cool and informative video. I got them all, but I have been playing tennis since I was a kid and in tournaments so it's somewhat intuitive and second-nature. I love stuff where you learn something; and that was this. Another fun, interesting rule I thought you might mention was when you hit a ball around and/or below the net poll. It is legal and you can win the point or put it back in play by hitting around and even below the level of the net pole.
Ricky Lee
Ricky Lee Vor Monat
Fun vid! Question: I'm playing doubles, receiving. My opponent at the net likes to hit the top of the net with his racquet, just before his partner serves. Sort of like he is checking his distance from the net, but with a solid whack. Sometimes the net is still bouncing when his partner serves. Is this OK?
qc1okay
qc1okay Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis The net is "bouncing"? Sounds like a hindrance to me. Hindrances aren't called before a point starts, so probably an umpire would simply tell the guy he can't distract his opponents by making the net bounce. I've seen plenty of doubles partners tap the net like this, but I've never seen a net bounce because of it. That's some weird net there.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yes. The point hasn’t started. You can touch the net before and after the point. Not during the point.
davced1
davced1 Vor Monat
A misconception on number 2 happened to me in doubles. My partner hit me with a 1st serve and our opponents thought they should win the point. I told them no it's just a serve fault we get a 2nd serve. It took some arguing but I knew we were right but they didn't fold until we asked the supervisor.
Matt C
Matt C Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis At what point do you start caring, I've played against a guy who had a big serve anyway, but was consistently serving from a yard inside the baseline, that's quite an advantage to ignore.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@davced1 it’s something I completely ignore with my opponents. I honestly never care if they’re foot faulting. My recommendation would be to not pay any attention to it as it’ll probably distract you more than them. Good luck!!!
davced1
davced1 Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Any advice on foot faults? I learned I can't call them when opponents make them even if they are blatant. Should I just tell them and hope they think about it? It gives them some unfair advantage.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
You were right. Hitting your partner is simply a missed serve. Second serve for you. 🎾😊👍✅
Chris Leavitt
Chris Leavitt Vor Monat
Good quiz! Proud to say I got all 5 plus bonus question 🙋
Boris VBW
Boris VBW Vor Monat
Thank you, very entertaining and instructive video👏
Henry Howard
Henry Howard Vor Monat
I believe you can touch the net with your body or racquet if your shot has bounced twice already on the other side!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Correct. Bc the point is over. Can’t touch while point is still going on.
Walter Wiederholt
I actually played a point in the 6th situation. I successfully reached over the net and won the point in my state doubles point!
Yan Li
Yan Li Vor Monat
Thank you so much. This is fun. Learned something new. 😃 And you are delightful to watch.
Jonas Persson
Jonas Persson Vor Monat
Can you finish your swing (follow-through) on the other side of the court, as long as you got the ball on your side, and you never touched the net?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yes that’s fine. Not a problem at all.
Mike the Dad Crosby
I've got a group that has hit massive backspin shots probably once or twice a year that hit and spin back over the net. We learned that rule (and about hitting the ball on the other side) after the second time.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Mike the Dad Crosby even if the ball bounces it’s still “in play” until the second bounce. Can’t touch the net until the scone bounce
Mike the Dad Crosby
@2MinuteTennis I once mishit a slice serve in a doubles match that just missed the net player but spun around enough (in the air) to catch the heel. They actually knew the rule. I also thought that if you charge in, hit a ball and it hits the court BEFORE you touch the net, you are OK.
Mike the Dad Crosby
@2MinuteTennis no problem "son"
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yep! Glad you knew it. Thanks “Dad”. Haha
Kevin Reilly
Kevin Reilly Vor Monat
Fantastic Ryan! Great stuff 👏
Jussi Räkköläinen
Thanks for the video. Double bounce question: Our hall is quite narrow and the net between courts are almost too close. If someone hits a slice serve with a good angle it is possible that the ball hits the net between courts before you can return it. I guess it is a double bounce at the time the ball touches the net even if you could try to do something as a returner from the "fishing net" between courts. Is it so?
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@Mark T. Wirth Agreed.
Mark T. Wirth
Mark T. Wirth Vor Monat
I’d say that the netting between courts is a permanent object and once the ball hits a permanent object the point is over except the only objects a ball can strike and point continue is net or net post/singles stick.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Once the ball hits the netting that’s considered the bounce. So on a serve that’s the second bounce. You’re racket can hit it but you can’t play the ball off the netting as if it’s racketball.
Marco Moriconi
Marco Moriconi Vor Monat
Great video! One controversial thing I have witnessed a few times is when the ball hits the racket twice in a sort of continuous motion. This is not a fault, right?
Laurent Storchi
Laurent Storchi Vor Monat
it's not a fault, but it can cause a lot of discussion.
Foong CS
Foong CS Vor Monat
Is OK if done in 1 swing
Pedro Bizarro
Pedro Bizarro Vor Monat
Hi Ryan, nice video! One question though: in that last situation where the ball bounces the first time in our side of the court and then back spins to the other side, could we run around the net, step in on the other side court, and strike the ball there (potentially to the net as you suggested)?
Laptorias
Laptorias Vor Monat
I am afraid you are not allowed to step inside of opponent court.
Leonardo Hermes
Leonardo Hermes Vor Monat
Hey Ryan, nice video! Got a follow-up question for rule#3. If what's debated is not a single/double bounce but a ball being in or out, who gets to make the final call? Still the player on whose side the ball was? Cheers:)
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Angel33Demon666 99.99% of all tennis matches do not have umpires. I’m not talking about pro matches.
Angel33Demon666
Angel33Demon666 Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis I thought it would always be the umpire making these calls?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Always the person who’s side it’s on. Final call.
Sn Zh
Sn Zh Vor Monat
Number 5 rule just happened with my partner in double game yesterday. She was by the ball and just watched it bounced back and did no try to touch it. She did not know what to do. And it was a high bounce and she had all time in the universe. She just stayed and watched it . We lost the point. ...but won the game :) Thanks for the video
Roeland Jaarsma
Roeland Jaarsma Vor Monat
Great lessons Ryan!! I have watched the Wimbledon-footage. As you can see the linesman calls the serve out. How can he be sure as the ball has not bounced on the court? :-)
JohnReese
JohnReese Vor Monat
@Tom R I know, this is really amazing to me as well.
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@JohnReese 100% what I was thinking. Also regarding the Wimbledon footage, it surprises me that the players don't seem to even know this rule. Why was the girl hitting the ball instead of avoiding it? This is a well known rule.
JohnReese
JohnReese Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Maybe it is because it is their only duty to signal if the ball has landed inside or outside the court, but it's up to the umpire to decide whether the ball has hit another obstacle beforehand? If he does so, their decision becomes moot obviously.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
I saw the same thing. That was a mistake by the lines judge. I think it was just reflex by the lines judge bc of how infrequent this situation is.
Taj Singh
Taj Singh Vor Monat
Thanks so much. It happened with me my apposite player were asking point and I was not agree at that point. Now I know rules.
Maurizio DeNapoli
Nice quiz but easy! We need more of these to challange ourself :-D
A T
A T Vor Monat
A disputed call technicality in a match with Michael Chang (I wish I remembered the specifics), he argued it with the umpire and lost. It was later determined he was right and the umpire wrong. Interesting that he knew the rules better than the umpire did, or rather that the umpire didn't know all the rules.
Alex Cheng
Alex Cheng Vor Monat
Found this argument, but I don't think it's what you're talking about, since despite the commentary, the replay shows Chang legitimately lost the point. de-vid.com/video/video-BOsaGM64LXQ.html
Fred Leggett
Fred Leggett Vor Monat
What was the situation?
Will Keyes
Will Keyes Vor Monat
I'm a coach and I got the first one wrong. Awesome video.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Hey coach!! Thanks for watching!! Appreciate you commenting. Have a great day!
Syl Hockey
Syl Hockey Vor Monat
I can think of another question for a future quiz: in doubles, can the receiver player standing at the net, volley the serve? Especially when the 2nd serve is a floater.
Syl Hockey
Syl Hockey Vor Monat
Thank you, love your videos. Miss you on Instagram :-)
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
No. Only the returner can return serve and all serves must bounce.
Vladimir Kitov
Vladimir Kitov Vor Monat
Sssuper useful, Ryan, thanks a lot! By the way, what is the source of all those rules, especially for #3 (one bounce or double bounce call by the hitter in an amateur match)?
Oleg Broido
Oleg Broido Vor Monat
Upd it only can be a point in amateur match as professional match always has an umpire.
Oleg Broido
Oleg Broido Vor Monat
Yes, the same question. Would be nice to check the proof for #3. Right today we had a discussion on court and opponents even consulted professional tennis umpire who didn’t support this Ryan’s position.
Noah Body
Noah Body Vor Monat
Good video. A very common one that happens with recreational players is the fresh air fault, the player misses the ball completely when serving. Try calling that one a fault at the local tennis courts and you'll end up in an argument.
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
I agree Noah. In a perfect world rules are rules, but sometimes you need to pick your battles to keep everyone having fun!
DrFearfall
DrFearfall Vor Monat
Nice. We want some more of these!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Haha I’ll make a part 2 that’s harder!!
Michele Grassi
Michele Grassi Vor Monat
As an ex chair umpire (non professional) i can say this is a good video, and even if i knew all these rules i made a little refresh :) I was expecting the case of the rule that you called number 6 after your explanation of your rule number 5 ;) About the double bouncing, instead, i was just used to call it and so the players didn' t have to worry about calling it.... and it seems easy to call it but believe me it' s not :)
Meni Sasson
Meni Sasson Vor Monat
Hey Ryan, nice video, did not know the first one! Follow-up question to #2: What happens if during the serve, the ball first hits the net, and then the opponents body? would that be a Let call? or 2nd serve? or point to the server?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Tom R haha tell that to my wife. Lol
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Thanks, legend!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Tom R when the serve tips the top of the net and is touched by the returner or returner’s partner in the air, it’s a let and redo the serve. Thanks!!
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Is it really a let? Interesting - I thought it would be server's point.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
A let. Redo the point. It’s happened to me actually. Redo the serve.
Gabriel Bendahan
Thanks for your videos. What if you frame the ball and you touch the ball twice (not on purpose) and the ball reaches to fall on the other side of the court ?
Michael Thorpe
Michael Thorpe Vor Monat
if it's unintention then it's a legal shot
Larz B
Larz B Vor Monat
With touching the net, there is a nuance. It is only seen as a fault as long as the ball is in play. I have had that I had to sprint for a ball, I made it but my balance was slowly tipping over closer and closer to the net, but I was able to not touch the net before the ball bounced twice. After the ball bounced twice I crashed the net from above. But the ball wasn't in play anymore, so it was my point.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Correct. Can’t touch the net while the point is still going on. Thanks!!
Tobi McBallz
Tobi McBallz Vor Monat
I know all the rulings. Nice display of the court. And great explanantion on why. A let (replay due to net tape ball) only occurs when serving. Any other net ball is legal for a point.
Buddy Pagano
Buddy Pagano Vor Monat
I knew pretty much all of them, including the "solution" to the last one. But I must admit I am not sure on whether you can, after reaching over, hit the ball anywhere else (apart from back into your court) instead of the net, to win the point?
Aequitas83
Aequitas83 Vor Monat
No it has to land in the playing court or hit the opponent's side of the net.
Shane Rooney
Shane Rooney Vor Monat
9:57 "... you just automatically won the point" No you didn't. You have a very high probability of winning the point due to the extreme difficulty for the oponent to return the ball. But that isn't "automatically" winning.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
You are correct.
Artem Bilous
Artem Bilous Vor Monat
Great video, I guess I am a tennis nerd since I have answered everything correctly
Mzee1084
Mzee1084 Vor Monat
I haven't seen that last one where a framed smash causes the ball to bounce back over. Though I have seen drop shots and drop volleys from time to time that have so much backspin that they bounce back over.
mcccalle
mcccalle Vor Monat
Question#1: What happens if the server stands outside of the single court, as described in the video? Does the returner automatically wins the point directly or (if it is 1st serve), does the server get to play a 2nd serve?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
It's a fault. So if a second serve then it's the returner's point.
biggabenne
biggabenne Vor Monat
had all these situations as well as losing a shoe on an adjacent court and coming back into my court and finishing the point.
Simón Bierozko
Simón Bierozko Vor 24 Tage
I still have a unanswered question! What if I rightfully strike the ball and, as it flies, it hits one of the side net' sticks and then goes in. Does the stick count as part of the net or is it a fault? :O
Matthew Chin
Matthew Chin Vor 23 Tage
Also, check out (d): 25. A GOOD RETURN It is a good return if: a. The ball touches the net, net posts/singles sticks, cord or metal cable, strap or band, provided that it passes over any of them and hits the ground within the correct court; except as provided in Rule 2 and 24 (d); or b. After the ball in play has hit the ground within the correct court and has spun or been blown back over the net, the player reaches over the net and plays the ball into the correct court, provided that the player does not break Rule 24; or c. The ball is returned outside the net posts, either above or below the level of the top of the net, even though it touches the net posts, provided that it hits the ground in the correct court; except as provided in Rules 2 and 24 (d); or d. The ball passes under the net cord between the singles stick and the adjacent net post without touching either net, net cord or net post and hits the ground in the correct court, or e. The player’s racket passes over the net after hitting the ball on the player’s own side of the net and the ball hits the ground in the correct court; or f. The player hits the ball in play, which hits another ball lying in the correct court
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 23 Tage
@Matthew Chin you are correct. But tennis clubs and school court around the USA have space there all the time. Speaking from experience.
Matthew Chin
Matthew Chin Vor 23 Tage
From the ITF rules: "The net shall be fully extended so that it completely fills the space between the two net posts and it must be of sufficiently small mesh to ensure that a ball cannot pass through it."
Matthew Chin
Matthew Chin Vor 23 Tage
@2MinuteTennis Can you point to the rule about this? We had this happen years ago and I seem to remember that I couldn't find a rule mentioning this space. I don't think it's supposed to exist on a proper court. No professional tournaments have nets with any gap that you can hit the ball through.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 23 Tage
@Matthew Chin doesn’t count. It can go around the net but it can go through that space or under the net.
Juan Pablo Sánchez Uriarte
Number 5 happens a lot on Paddel tennis due to the walls, and the rule is the same, you can touch tha ball on the other side. GREAT VIDEO. Thanks
paf
paf Vor Monat
good one thank you. On scenario 2, does this apply also to a direct hit of opponent during the point i.e. after serve. E.g opponent is outside court and my shot hits his leg directly. His point or mine?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Your point. If your ball it’s them on the air it’s your point. And it doesn’t matter where they’re standing or how fat “out” your ball was “going to be”. Your point.
SavvySamizzles23
9:37 when you said that you are allowed to hit the ball into the opponent's side of the net, what did you mean by "hit it down, back into their side of net?" For clarification, do you HAVE to hit on the opponent's side of the court first and then into the net or can you just not have it bounce and hit the ball into the net?
Multi Ibrahim
Multi Ibrahim Vor 26 Tage
I got 2 , 4 , 5 , and 6 right .. But with all due respect I disagree with you in the 1st and 3rd situations .. In the 1st : the player can cross the base line before the other player serves , but yet you were correct with the parallel vertical lines .. In the 3rd : the umpire chair ref who’s the one to decide whether it bounced once or twice , and no body can challenge that call .
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 26 Tage
I never talked about the returner. The returner can stand anywhere. I was talking about the server. And I was talking about normal marshes…not matches that have chair umpires.
Ram Kumar
Ram Kumar Vor Monat
Very helpful, thanks!
robert ma
robert ma Vor Monat
Great video Ryan. Keep it up. If it comes to rule 6, I heard the doubles case that due to strong wind the ball was coming back high above the net pretty close to the net post. Once the net player noticed it, he run around the net post on opponents side and managed to hit the ball off the air to opponents court side winning apparently the point. There was a long dispute about it but the hitter was 100% sure he was allowed. What is your opinion about this case ?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
I’m na pretty sure that as long as he didn’t step onto the court of the opponents then He’s fine.
Mathias Johanson
@#1: "The receiver may stand anywhere inside or outside the court." Rule 8 Case 1 ITF rules
Fernando Dangelo
Muy bueno tu vídeo. Te escribo en Español por no es bueno mi inglés. Podrías agregar cuando una pelota bota sobre otra que quedó sin retirar de la cancha y que se considera un bote y debes pegarle a cualquiera de las 2 antes que de el second bounce
Sarel Ras
Sarel Ras Vor Monat
Been watching tennis on and off my whole life follow tennis from a distance these day very insightful
Patrick McCall
Patrick McCall Vor Monat
Fantastic video Ryan !!! Can your opponent “break” the plane of the net when hitting a shot. I think he can but he can’t make contact on your side. Correct ?
UD Racing
UD Racing Vor Monat
Contact has to be on their side, follow trough over the net is ok as long as they don’t touch it
TridKP
TridKP Vor 29 Tage
HOLY COW! You’re telling me I won a point when I nailed someone in the armpit on the serve? If only I saw this video before 😫
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor 29 Tage
Yep! You actually won.
Arun Ramachandran
Question: If your opponent hits the ball which bounces in your court and spins back to their side of the court. Are you allowed to run over to their side of the court to touch the ball instead of reaching over the net?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Yes but you can’t touch their court.
Tom Chesney
Tom Chesney Vor Monat
As far as touching the net or court on the opponent's side in both the 4th and 5th examples you can touch the net or court IF the point is already over as in a second bounce or you hit the opponent with the ball or fence BEFORE you touch the net etc..
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
You are correct. Thanks Tom!
halffulltome
halffulltome Vor Monat
I actually didn’t know about #1 and I’ve had opponents serves from the alley. But I disagree that it’s an advantage for them. If someone does that you adjust your return position to be a little wider. Yes they can hit a wider serve but it’s also harder for them to hit up the T out of your reach. In other words, they don’t magically get a wider range of serving angles doing that.
Bill Wall
Bill Wall Vor Monat
Once again Ryan, I had the double bounce question ready to ask, for Friday but saw this and thought I would watch it first. Is there a good way to tell if a ball has bounced twice so you can call it right on yourself?
Pera Kojot
Pera Kojot Vor Monat
@Bill Wall Simply speaking if you get it in time you are gonna get it under and the ball will have slice spin. If it's a double bounce you're gonna get it over and the ball will have topspin.
Bill Wall
Bill Wall Vor Monat
@Pera Kojot great find. Thanks. So if you get under it in time the ball will pop up but if not there is a lower trajectory?
Pera Kojot
Pera Kojot Vor Monat
Yes there is, here is Federer explaining to the umpire how to do it: de-vid.com/video/video-8ofNg0y8w60.html
David Viner
David Viner Vor Monat
Interesting. Regarding #6. Reach over to play the backspin but hit the ball back onto your own side! Who wins the poiint?
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
If it bounced on opponent’s side first you’re good. But if you hit it straight to your own side then you lose the point. You have to hit ball down into their court first before it would be allowed to come back to your side.
claudio zanella
claudio zanella Vor Monat
I didn't know the first one, I thought the server can be anywhere (behind the court of course). Never happens in reality because the server is afraid of giving too much place free for return.
Tim Moody
Tim Moody Vor Monat
In the first scenario, you don't have to stand behind baseline like you said. Anywhere from net backwards
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Can you explain? Not sure what you mean.
druchan@gmail.com
For the first rule, do you need to have both feet or just 1 foot inside the court you play?
thomas medeiros
thomas medeiros Vor Monat
Both feet and this applies to the center mark as well as the sideline.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Both feet.
X G
X G Vor Monat
Thanks for the video. If your first serve is let and then hit your opponent (with no bounce) does the server win the point or gets another first serve?
The Chairman
The Chairman Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Understood. Thanks for the clarification :)
Munditimum Mosu
Munditimum Mosu Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis In other words, your body is considered part of the court...Thanks Ryan for this video...maybe you should have a "Tennis Rules" series?🍻
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@The Chairman it’s not “automatically” the server’s point in this case. It was a let serve. So it’s a replay of point.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@The Chairman I’ll clarify. You serve, the ball hits the top of the net, the ball carries “out” all the way back to the returner, the returner hits the ball without the ball bouncing on the ground. It’s a let. Redo the serve. Once the ball hits the top of the net on the serve, if the opponent touches the ball before it bounces, the point is replayed.
The Chairman
The Chairman Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis Can you please clarify. Surely, it can only be deemed a let if the ball bounces inside the service box. Given there was no bounce and it hit the opponent before bouncing, it's your point.
OdosNiovis
OdosNiovis Vor Monat
And one more question: Can I call my own serve out? Sometimes, certain opponents, when they make a very good return at a serve, they call it in, because even if it's clearly out, they get an advantage from their good return, so they opt for continuing the point, without calling it out, in order to avoid receiving a second serve. It's a triviality and rarely happens on a court, but it's very annoying
Tom R
Tom R Vor Monat
@R S lol
R S
R S Vor Monat
Not on the first serve. But you are free to call your own second serve out as it automatically awards the point to your opponent.
Matt C
Matt C Vor Monat
Not your call as others said, though to be fair they should be calling it straight away, if they are delaying calls long enough to judge whether the return was good enough then that would be a very late call in my book and I think you can legitimately tell them to call quicker in future or you'll assume they are playing on. (If you can be reacting to hit the ball you can be reacting to call it out in the same time frame, shouldn't be any real need to call noticably after hitting it except for rare occasions where it is sometimes so marginal you actually have to replay it in your mind perhaps. In that circumstance I would probably continue on the basis it is in rather than late call anyway.)
Con-Man
Con-Man Vor Monat
Even if you think it's clearly out they may genuinely think it's in. So you always need to play as if it's in unless they actually call it out. It's the returner's call on whether the serve is in or not.
Roronoa Zoro
Roronoa Zoro Vor Monat
No, if there is no umpire it's their side of the court and only they can decide if the ball is in or out( unless it's a clay court where you can see the bounce of the ball, only in that case you can call your serve out). If they don't call the ball out you have to continue playing
Arash Bahraini
Arash Bahraini Vor Monat
Thanks ryan, i knew all these and i faced many of people who dont know or cannot believe what you say... as provide, i had to show them the role book or such questions you answered by the way the last scenario is almost impossible in single and very hard to execute in doubles as you may touch the net easily. Finally, two common issues i saw players dont know about : 1. double hit on racket : if you double or even triple hit the ball with your racket while you executed 1 continues swing, it will count as 1 and both of you have to continue playing 2. ball hits another ball which is in the court : if players cannot say which ball bounced, it will be a LET. otherwise, player should continue and run for the ball. then always put balls out of your court before serve
Tyler Nielson
Tyler Nielson Vor Monat
Scenario: Doubles match and I'm serving my first serve. What happens if I hit my partner in the back of the head with my first serve? Does the other side win the point or is that a second serve opportunity?
Mark T. Wirth
Mark T. Wirth Vor Monat
Second serve but your partner is pissed.
Andrey Pozhidaev
this is a typical situation when the pitcher has little experience and wants to serve quickly. In such a situation, we cover our head with a racket before serving, and close the kidneys with our free hand.😁🎾🇷🇺
A T
A T Vor Monat
Sounds like your partner needs a new partner. (:
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Haha it’s simply a fault. So second serve. And you’ll need to buy your partner an ice pack and a cold beer afterward.
dj7oya
dj7oya Vor Monat
What a coincidence! The second rule I've just learned yesterday! I almost hit the person that was in the net. By the way I sent you a video to your email for corrections on my serve haha
dj7oya
dj7oya Vor Monat
But I didn't hit the net, never thought of that.
dj7oya
dj7oya Vor Monat
9:16 and I also scored a point that way yesterday... lots of dirty dropshots from my friends, crazy game
Wally Cho
Wally Cho Vor Monat
For the last case, I wonder if you're allowed to jump over the net as long as you don't land on the court before the point is over.
Maurice Allen
Maurice Allen Vor Monat
I’d like to add to point two, that it doesn’t just have to be on a serve. If any of your shots even after the serve hits your opponent before hitting the court, you win the point.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
@Kent Lewis yep. Thanks for the comment!
Kent Lewis
Kent Lewis Vor Monat
The big argument usually is when the opoonent is standing outside the court area and the ball hits him before bouncing. The argument is that they were standing out of bounds when the ball struck them. But it doesn't matter. The opponent can't interfere with the ball bouncing first.
Maurice Allen
Maurice Allen Vor Monat
@2MinuteTennis love your videos!
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
You’re correct. But the argument usually happens on serves. During the point you’re allowed to hit the ball before it bounces. Not during the serve.
Craig Lee
Craig Lee Vor Monat
6 out of 6. Only add that in doubles, double bounces can also be called by the partner of the player playing the ball.
Austin Edwards
Austin Edwards Vor Monat
Rule 2 means every 1st serve is dodgeball from here on out for me.
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
Haha be careful out there.
Ralph Stoever
Ralph Stoever Vor Monat
Great video thanks. You could add this video of Maestro Roger Federer himself winning with th 5th case in doubles in Brisbane 2014 playing with Mahut against Chardy and Dimitrov (not a B-list double by any measure): de-vid.com/video/video-cLBZYZOYkFk.html
Chris Leavitt
Chris Leavitt Vor Monat
Should do a quiz about interference, in amateur tennis I see it all the time in doubles
Manish Khanna
Manish Khanna Vor Monat
One question regarding the last rule you discussed, when the ball is spinning back into the opponent side and i try touching the ball to put it into the net, what if ball gets back to my side after touching instead of getting into the net Who wins the point now
2MinuteTennis
2MinuteTennis Vor Monat
The opponent’s point. My shot must land in my opponent’s court off my racket.
Dave Davies
Dave Davies Vor Monat
For #5, does one need to reach over the net and hit the ball before it bounces on the opponents side of the net?. If it bounces on their side, it is effectively a double bounce which would make it the opponents point?
Bhoba
Bhoba Vor Monat
I knew the serve hit one because we were in conference last year and we lost the match because the serve hit my doubles partner standing by the net
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